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June 30, 2015

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Thank you so much, Christina! I do wake up with the equivalent of the box of 48 crayons! Right now I'm using scissors and flinging paint!

What a lovely image of little Laura with her colors! This is still very much you - don't doubt yourself! I hope you wake up every morning with your box of crayons beside your bed ready for whatever beautiful adventures the day will bring you. :)

Marly, those are good questions... and I know how you have struggled with how the larger world values/doesn't value the work of poets and novelists. But you ARE making beautiful and true work and that is what, on our death beds, will really matter to us. And before our death beds, too! We visual artists have the added joy of being able to surround ourselves with our work, hang it on our walls and to experience our paintings/drawings/illustrations in their entirety pretty easily... as opposed to writers and musicians for whom the work is revealed over the time it takes to read it or perform it. These daily glimpses, often by happenstance and usually at an oblique angle, really keep me going.

Thank you so much, Sandra! But I clearly see your younger self (as I imagine her) in YOUR paintings, too! You have a more controlled/realistic painting style than mine, but that really has nothing to do with the inner ebullience you, too, seem to have been born with! Thank you for your lovely comment.

What a great post Laura - So thought provoking! I wish my younger self would show her face more often in my art! There's nothing like 'assuming' we can draw and as children, that's exactly what we all do - before we start worrying what other people think! Beautiful drawings too - of course!

A beautiful trajectory... A path well worth the taking, little and big Laura!

I wonder why I ever worried about anything connected with what I make. Why was it so important to do anything but make the most best, most beautiful and true stories and poems possible, and to leap out farther and farther as I progressed? What did it matter, in a country increasingly focused on material success as a measure of everything, including art, whether I gained worldly success or not?

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